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Sustainable Living in the Tropics: Green School, Bali

As we become more and more aware of the impacts technology has on the environment, sustainable design has become a concept grasped by many interior design and architecture professionals. This concept of design aims to reduce the negative impacts many industries have on the environment, as well as to maximize the health and comfort of those occupying the building. For conservationists and designers John and Cynthia Hardy, motivating communities on how to live sustainably was the driving force for the Green School – a natural and holistic campus set amongst the lush greenery in Badung, Bali.

The inspiring school, built by , lies on both sides of the Ayung River and is surrounded by dense jungle and sustainable organic gardens – such a beautiful backdrop for a school! Local sustainably grown bamboo was used for the artistic structures that make up the school as well as the majority of the furniture and fixtures, demonstrating the potential the natural material has, both structurally and visually.

The campus comprises of large multi-story communal spaces, smaller classrooms, offices, faculty accommodation, cafes, bathrooms, and a gymnasium – all of which have their own unique design that involve local building techniques and architecture. A beautiful arched bamboo bridge, in a Minangkabau design, extends from one side of the Ayung to the other – a proud display of Indonesia’s many traditional architectural designs.

Hydro-powered vortex generators and solar panels help power the school, whilst clever use of bamboo is also incorporated into unconventional energy sources, achieved through bamboo sawdust heating systems.

Not only is this school beautiful to look at, but also the meaning behind it is a message we all should take on board. If the photos aren’t inspiring enough, then attend a of the school to view a true holistic community that takes green living to the next level.

Jessica

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